AMADEUS REMASTERED HD - MOZART INSULTS SALIERI BY PLAYING HIS OWN PIECE BETTER THAN HE DID

10/12/2019 को प्रकाशित
This is one of my favorite scenes from Amadeus. It is rare for a film to have two actors be nominated for the same award. Thomas Hulce eventually lost to F. Murray Abraham at the Oscars, but there is no denying that both gave outstanding performances.

It was said that the real Mozart had a very childlike laugh which Hulce does his best imaginative version of. The laugh is so jarring and out of the blue that it catches the Emperor off guard twice.

Mozart is either arrogant or socially unaware because he insults Salieri multiple times. As Mozart plays Salieri's little march and notes "the rest is just the same, isn't it?" you can see how maligned Salieri felt. Then to top it off Mozart declares "that doesn't quite work, now does it?" and then proceeds to take Salieri's tune and add embellishments and improvisation such that Salieri can only look on in jealousy mixed with resentment.

Salieri's jealousy and contempt for Mozart is best summed up with the line "Grazie, Signore..." as he looks up at the crucifix.

All rights to Amadeus (Orion pictures).

टिप्पणियाँ

  • The emperor butchered Salieri's piece, but Mozart was able to play it perfectly by only hearing it and then improvising the melody... "the rest is just the same, isn't it?" Mozart so innocent in his behavior he doesn't realize how insulting he is LOL

    • And after hearing it only once !

    • @Mad9977 Productions the rivalry is quite fictitious and ahistorical. in the film he is mocking, yes.

    • Alas, such is the curse with the gift of autism, our good intentions are misunderstood.

    • Great one Elsa Anna Arendelle, you of the most flowing symphonic name! Mozart invents music as an expression of joyous life in motion as he happily plays he tickles the keys. The others there haha, must have been inhaling that wig powder. Great joy the last 2 minutes rock in my head!!! Great statement the way his dialogue rolls over the bitter fish scowls of Salieri !!!! Priceless moments enrich our souls. Thank you for this treasure ~RaVen~

    • Ikr 😂😂😂

  • Never get tired of watching this segment of this great film over the life of the greatest composer of all time. I own the DVD and strongly recommend younger generation acquiring it for educational so they can understand how today’s musical is more of an Industrial consuming and throw away product.

  • Well...there it is.

  • Totally invented for the movie. Salieri was a really great musician

  • To be fair the emperor did it quite well on his first try considering I would fumble around with the first 5 keys

  • Mozart (Tom Hulce) later sang as Quasimodo in Disney's Hunchback of Notre Dame. :) "Out there, strolling by the Seine"

  • He completely rewrote the song but keep the cadence and spirt

  • Hattrapworldwide

  • My dad had all us kids watch this a few decades ago. Was miserable.... But now it brings back fond memories.

  • Troll

  • That laugh

  • "=D

  • This movie and the Shawshank redemption are two of my absolute favourites

  • Alguien sabe si hay una versión en español?

  • Possible the first ever trap remix created in history.

  • Orchestra directors would often change parts they didn't like...even replace with bits from other composers. Just ask Tchaikovsky. They would do it right in front of him in rehearsals. The world of classical music is very interesting and anyone with a love for music would get a lot out of reading some history of it.

  • Saliere was a government employee churning out mediocrity. And always a Rosenberg in the mix.

  • RIP Mozart

  • Live action Spongebob Squarepants here

  • Salieri speaks to nearly all of us at the end: Mediocrities everywhere, I absolve you! in-cd.com/chart/v-iy/fohhjq5mpquXmqs.html

  • Did anyone else see the colour of the keys on that piano Mozart is playing is inverted

  • Man standing aside left at Salieri is very good actor. He looks so funny. Love him!

  • I read that as among us

  • That look Salieri gave the emperor after Mozart saying it was already in his head..priceless…

  • Pourquoi ces stupides ricanements !!!

  • Guys, that was just a movie! I don't know why Salieri was presented this way, maybe just to spice the movie, but there was no reality in this. Mozart and Salieri had mutual respect. Salieri taught music to Mozart's son. Do you really imagine that could happen if they hated each other that much? Never! Saliert taught Mozart's son because he was considered as a capable person.

  • ....

  • MEN IN WIGS

  • Spongebob and Squidward in a past life.

  • Gotta find this movie 😂 love it

  • This scene is a portrayal that a truly elevated mind, a genius so to speak may be socialized but they think and act in ways that are outside of conventional norms which is the same way they think. We will also come to see that just because someone may be a genius in one area of life, it does not mean that they are also a genius in other areas of life infact its is the norm that they are not...worse still they are below average in intelligence in areas outside their chief skill. This is an important lesson I wish everything could figure out because we live in a world that is immersed in celebrities and stars and geniuses who then go on to become spokes people for politics, causes, activism, etc when they are completely wrong headed, idiotic, imbecilic, mornonic on these subjects...they are only talented in the one area where they have talent...a few manage to expand their talent such as an actor expanding into directing but that is not common and often times people are not as successful in their new areas as they were in their primary expression of talent.

  • Thank you Elsa! Here’s a little something for fun: in-cd.com/chart/v-iy/bGJlu7V7j5qxerc.html

  • The fucking egos holy shit

  • Zero black people around. Hmmmmm

    • I was expecting to see Shaft but they only appropriated his hairstyle.

  • every piece by Mozart is flex, but this is a massive flex 😅

  • Tampoco aquí les resultó bien, verdad grandes y venerables p*tones.

  • 😆😆😆😆😆😆😆😆😆

  • Why didn’t Tom Hulce, go on to other roles ??

  • Is this what a vintage curb stomp looks like?

  • I love this movie because it’s very entertaining, and while most of the stuff about Salieri is is made up historical fiction, particularly the fact that he killed Mozart, he DID actually claim that he did it in real life when he was a senile old man in his late 60s-70s in a mental institution. Since this entire story is being told as a confession to a priest by an elderly and senile Salieri in a mental institution, it’s very plausible to interpret Salieri as a very unreliable narrator in the movie. You could even assume that he’s not telling the truth at all about being an extremely repressed Catholic who chose to give up sex and marriage in his plea to be made a great musician through God, Mozart having an affair with a woman he loved, Mozart being THAT childish and obnoxious, and Salieri killing him because he was resentful and jealous. You could just assume that these are just mad ravings of a demented and senile old man. That’s why the movie works. It also helps that the music is lovely and the two leading actors do a great job with their roles. Still, there is SOME truth to the story, particularly in regards to Mozart’s characterization, family, and backstory in the movie. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart WAS a musical child prodigy who wrote his first composition at five, his first symphony at 8, and his first full scale opera at just 12 years old. They weren’t just simple little little melodies that you would expect from a five-to twelve year child. They were beautiful and complex melodies. His father Leopold was a composer who DID take his son under his wing to teach him everything he knew about music, and toured Europe with him to show him off when he was just a little boy. Leopold Mozart really WAS a rather controlling, disapproving, overbearing, and overprotective parent in regards to the personal lives of his children, even when they reached their adulthoods. Not only did he disapprove of Wolfgang marrying Constanze Weber and moving in with her without his consent first, but he also tried to sabotage his daughter Maria Anna’s marriage too. While probably not as boastful and impolite in public as portrayed in Amadeus, in real life, Mozart really WASN’T always this modest and humble prodigy either. He knew his music was amazing, but a lot of his contemporaries really DID think that there were “too many notes” in his music and thought he was trying too hard to sound impressive. In his letters to and from his father in Vienna from the 1780s, Wolfgang DOES come across as being a conceited and delusional brat towards the Italians in Vienna by unfairly accusing them of forming “cabals” led by Salieri to actively sabotage his attempts to establish himself as a composer there. The letters suggest that Wolfgang, Leopold, and Nanneral resented the Italians for their special place in Austrian courts, considering the fact that they were Austrian themselves. This resentment that Mozart had towards Salieri probably originated from an incident in 1781 when Salieri got the job to be the music teacher of Princess Elisabeth of Würtemmberg instead of Mozart because he had a better reputation as singing and piano instructor. While I do think Mozart WAS a better composer than Salieri, though Salieri was pretty good at composing, too, Salieri was a better music TEACHER than Mozart was in Vienna at the time, so he got the post instead. If there was any evidence of ridiculous jealousy and resentment between Mozart and Saleri, it was actually on Mozart’s side in real life, not Saleri’s. Even then, Mozart still got along with Saleri in public, and never tried to sabotage him, or put him down as a musician. He and his family were just venting their frustrations in private letters about Wolfgang struggling to establish hims as a successful composer, musician, and music teacher in Vienna. However, like his attitude in public in the movie, there definitely IS this sense of arrogance, boastfulness, and pettiness in his and his family’s ridiculous accusations of the Italians secretly plotting to sabotage his success in Vienna. Like, Wolfgang and his family never thought to themselves that the reason why Wolfgang wasn’t becoming a success in Vienna couldn’t possibly be because of the fact that Mozart was a spendthrift, his skills as a music teacher needed some improvement, or the fact that his contemporaries in Vienna simply preferred Salieri’s music compositions over his at the time because Mozart’s style was very bright, colorful, complex, flowery, long, and new, while Saleri’s compositions were more concrete and straightforward easy listening to the public…Instead, Wolfgang and his family came up with this ridiculous theory in their letters that the Italians “had” to be in cahoots together to make him fail. Granted, even in real life, I do prefer Mozart’s music over Salieri’s, as do most of us today, and he was under-appreciated during his time, which they were all well aware of.Of course, he was an amazing composer and musician, but it takes a lot more to become a success than JUST being amazing. You have to be able to work well with other people, the general public has to recognize your music as being “amazing,” even if it’s technically only average. So, while not nearly as overt about it in public as he was portrayed as being in the movie Amadeus, Wolfgang really DID low-key have somewhat of an arrogant and narcissistic side to his personality at times. While Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart DID make a pretty good living as a composer in Vienna for his family and himself, he really WAS a spendthrift, who found himself in debt a lot quickly afterwards because he spent too much money on himself, his wife, and their son, so he went around begging his friends and contemporaries for money when he ran out. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart really DID have a dirty low brow sense of humor. He loved potty humor and sex jokes so much that he even wrote a three part choral piece called “Leck mich im Arcshe” (“Kiss My Ass”) as a joke for a party to sing with his friends. However, in real life Mozart wasn’t THAT much of an alcoholic, or party/frat boy. He was much more introverted, and capable of being mature when he needed to be in public in comparison to how he was portrayed in Amadeus in real life. While an extremely gifted composer with superior technical skill as a musician, even child prodigy Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s music compositions went through several corrections and revisions in real life. It is NOT like in Amadeus in which Saleri claims Mozart just wrote down whatever he heard in his head on blank sheet music perfectly in tune every time with “no corrections,” “like he was just taking dictations.” That’s a superhuman ability that even most geniuses aren’t capable of 100% of the time. Considering the fact that the story in this movie is primarily being told from the POV of an elderly and demented Saleri, who believes that Mozart had this superhuman superiority as a composer in comparison to him and other composers when he is in a mental institution, it is completely probable that he is exaggerating the strength of Mozart’s skills as musician and composer as better than they actually were. I’m not saying that Mozart’s music isn’t amazing or that he wasn’t a genius. He was. Along with Beethoven, Mozart is still considered the greatest and most popular of classical composers in history over two centuries after his death for a good reason, but he still was a human being who made mistakes and revisions when composing music just like any other composer. There also isn’t any evidence that Salieri killed him out of envy and resentment. There’s more evidence that they actually were supportive of each other in real life, who openly admired each other’s work. Salieri also wasn’t this extremely devout Catholic in real life, who vowed to remain abstinent throughout his life to God in exchange for the ability to become a great composer and musician. In fact, he had a wife and several children. There is little to no evidence that the young opera singer Caterina Cavileri, who was singing the lead role of Konstanze in Mozart’s German opera The Abduction from the Seraglio, actually ever had an affair with Mozart, as Salieri believed he had in Amadeus. In real life, there’s actually more evidence that Salieri had an affair with her than Mozart. While there are truths to real life here and there, particularly with Mozart’s character, the writers of Amadeus also definitely made Salieri much austere and conservative than he actually was in real life, and they made Mozart much more of a childish, outgoing, and popular playboy and party/frat dude than he actually was in real life, so that they could give Salieri a reason to despise him so much that he would want to kill him in the play.

  • Way too many notes. No wonder no one’s ever heard of him.

  • Elsa bro I bet you're a real cutie.

  • Lmao! You can see the emperors hands twitch as he was visibly startled when Mozart Cackled at The End!! That’s some great detail.

  • Everytime I see this I think Mozart should have been played by Keith Moon drummer of the Who.

  • Who knew Mozart was such a handsome and funny fella. 😍

  • Siempre tengo en mente a Mozart y su muerte , abandonado por todos los que disfrutaron de su genialidad . Además se reía de sus propias genialidades

  • Mozart and Salieri were actually great friends.

  • Everyone: Mozart is a genius blah blah Me: spongebob laugh...

  • Nobody back then talked like this lol

  • Best film

  • Talk about s******* on a mother f*****! AAA HAHAHAHAH!

  • I love that scene.

  • what the name of that song he played ?

  • And so far not one comment about how M is a genius. That is M for Milos. Milos Forman.

  • Except, you know, Salieri didn't play the piece in this clip, the musically inept emperor did.

  • 2021 and we still listen to Mozart. Says it all

  • Couldve been a duet. And that was the gift.

  • My parents are 88 and 94. They LOVE this scene!

  • I will impress if a DJ remastered this

  • 😍

  • Honestly on a first sight read the emperor’s not bad at all

  • They should remake this film with Pete Rock as Salieri and 9th Wonder as Mozart.

  • First remix ever

  • I can’t believe the camera man actually traveled time just to record this

    • You sure? Thought this man just invented a video camera and was forgotten in time.

  • An Austrian with an american accent talking to italians with english accents..alrighty then

  • 00:49 Salieri is visibly dying inside.

  • They are all so phony. Mozart is the only one who has any legitimacy

  • When Mozart took over dude’s song, the look on the other guy’s faces were simply saying in street terms… ‘Damn ockk, how u just gonna let young boah come in here and straight remix your tune just like that Son’!!!!! 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

  • Salieri then wept, ran home and changed his name to Fanchen. He sealed himself away inside a tomb, where he feasted on his own shame and drank the thought of one day performing a song unlike anything the world had ever experienced. Until one day, 500 years later, an anonymous poster on the Internet issued a challenge that no mortal man would dare take.

  • This movie is masterclass plain and simple

  • Welp, time to watch this movie again. It's been a minute

  • So this was like when Metallica kicked Dave Mustaine out of the band..

  • Omar was a chivato..!

  • 🎧

  • in-cd.com/chart/v-iy/aJSAxd2vm3XXZq8.html

  • in-cd.com/chart/v-iy/naqZo6aJhmi7Zbs.html

  • My world history high school students loved this movie every year. It exemplifies the humanism and creativity of the Enlightenment and human passions affecting human relations/ life. SOOO Classical! The Turkish influence is obvious to me.

  • Hi there.. Please check out these beautiful piano compositions. it is really calm and relaxing. You're gonna love it : in-cd.com/chart/v-iy/qn-rlNWRh3uyf9E.html in-cd.com/chart/v-iy/q5d72pqQpmvTo7M.html Thank you..

  • Genius

  • Open the steins gate!

  • "Grazie Signore..."

  • Horrible casting...this could have been one of the greats

  • Why Mozart hate italians? :) Vivaldi is first great composer all time!

    • @Faruk Ç. Dindar How would I do that? There's no way to prove that music is or isn't great. It's my opinion that Monteverdi's Orfeo is great, but if you disagree I can't change your mind. And you can't prove to me that Vivaldi is better than everyone before him. It's a matter of opinions.

    • @Teresa Gardiner My opinian? So, pls tell me about these guy's songs like 4 Seasons greatnes.

    • @Faruk Ç. Dindar No. That's your opinion. I think Josquin, Byrd and Monteverdi (at least) are all greater than Vivaldi.

    • @Teresa Gardiner They were good composer but not GREAT not TOP 5! Like Vivaldi. ;) Beethove, Vivaldi, Bach and Mozart are best composers of all time. Period!

    • @Faruk Ç. Dindar Um, Monteverdi, Lully, Purcell, Palestrina, Lassus, Victoria, Byrd, Josquin, DuFay, Dunstable, Machaut, Leonin, Perotin, Hildegard. Those are some of the more famous ones.

  • WHY ARE YOU YELLING?

  • People’s senses of themselves from this time period freak me out.

  • this was before anyone had considered the idea of NOT wearing a stupid fucking hat

  • Salieri's constant look of contempt and despise is understandable. After all, wouldn't you be mad, if you were made to dress up like a nun who left the sisterhood, and married a man, who passed away the eve of your wedding, rendering you a widow.

  • One of my favorite scenes in cinematic history. Not only entertaining and beautifully shot; but so much character advancement, plot development and foreshadowing all unfolds naturally in just a few minutes.

  • Escuchar a Mozart, estimula el cerebro...lo veo, lo escucho y apenas lo creo...

  • Mozart was the Victorian Elton John; just a straight up rockstar.

  • Does this piece has a name?

  • Look!It’s Mr.Rooney!

  • I remember being showed this in music class

  • Fabolous, this is my favorite part of this movie!! Funniest!!!

  • Damn I love it, lmfao.

  • GENIUSSSSSSS

  • The two main leads are just absolutely talented!!! This movie is definitely one for the ages. I wish it would get more appreciated by this generation.

  • It's still so weird as an Austrian to see non-Austrians portraying our best composer. There's so many films and documentaries about him, but this is the one that most ppl know. Most ppl in Austria actually never saw this movie.

  • Proof that Mozart was a descendant of a dog: 3:27 - 3:30 Play it in a loop if you have doubts.

  • Movie is unavailable to watch in my location....??? but im 'murican!!!! come on Prime..